Communication

Communication Course Offerings

Communication course offerings will be found under the 4 letter code of COMM in the course listings.

205 – Public Speaking (3)

Study of the basic principles of public address; emphasis is on developing a theoretical and practical understanding of oral communication through practice in preparing, delivering, and criticizing speeches in class.

206 – Small Group Communication (3)

Study of the theories and principles of effective communication and decision making in small group contexts. Emphasis is on understanding communication dynamics and on improving one’s communication capabilities as a participant in and leader of small groups.

208 – Interpersonal Communication (3)

Study of Interpersonal Communication.

209 – Argumentation (3)

Study of the use of reasoning in persuasive communication with emphasis on the construction, evaluation, presentation, refutation, and defense of oral arguments.

316 – Strategic Communication (3)

This course emphasizes communication in organizations with a specific focus on persuasive communication, negative news delivery, conflict management, and crisis resolution. Students learn effective communication strategies for dealing with conflicts among individuals, personnel, and management. The course stresses conflict identification and intervention strategies and underscores the importance of consensus building, negotiation, mediation, and arbitration.

317 – Corporate Interpersonal Communication (3)

This course addresses personal communication within corporations, organizations, and non-profit agencies. Students discuss and learn effective communication strategies for different audiences, contexts, and rhetorical situations. Document design, content, and tone are discussed in relation to letters, memos, and emails as well as other common communication formats in the workplace such as wikis and blogs. The legal issues and ramifications relating to these forms of communication are addressed. In addition, students analyze their oral personal communication skills in one-on-one settings, group meetings, briefings, and formal presentations, and with distinct audiences such as: colleagues, subordinates, supervisors, vendors, suppliers, and customers. Students also explore the significance of non-verbal communication. Cross-cultural communication and workplace diversity are also covered.

350 – Introduction to Rhetoric and Communication (3)

Introduction to human communication studies, focusing on the history, theory, criticism and mediation of persuasive messages to discover their roles in human society, culture, and contemporary life.

351 – Communication and Political Campaigns (3)

Study of persuasive communication in political campaigns, emphasizing the evaluation and criticism of campaign speeches, televised debates, and political advertising.

352 – American Public Argument (3)

Study of the rhetorical features of American public argument. This course examines how affirmation, contestation, and intervention work their way through rhetorical systems to become the basis for conventional wisdom and public policy in the American experience.

353 – Visual Rhetoric (3)

Study of the rhetorical use of visual texts with an emphasis on the development and use of visual arguments.

354 – Environmental Rhetoric (3)

Study of persuasive strategies used to discuss environmental issues with an emphasis on the interface between the scientific community, policymakers, and the public.

355 – Rhetoric of Science (3)

Study of the rhetorical features of the scientific enterprise.

356 – Rhetoric of Controversy (3)

Study of the rhetorical features of public controversies.

370 – Topics in Speech Communication (3)

Studies in major figures, movements, and problems in speech communication theory and practice. Consult Schedule of Courses for specific topics.

450 – Studies in Rhetoric and Communication (3)

Study of rhetoric and human communication; consult Schedule of Courses for specific topics.

481 – Policy Debate Practicum (1)

Credit for satisfactory work on the University’s intercollegiate policy debate team. Enrollment by permission of instructor and the department. No more than 8 credits of Practicum (481, 482, 483) may count toward the 120 hours required for graduation; four credits may be counted in the English major.

482 – Public Debate Practicum (1)

Credit for satisfactory work on the University’s public debate team. Enrollment by permission of the instructor and department. No more than 8 credits of Practicum (481, 482, 483) may count toward the 120 hours required for graduation; four may be counted in the English major.

483 – Communication Consulting Practicum (1)

Prerequisite: COMM 205 or permission of the instructor. Students will review, study, and apply the principles of public speaking, rhetoric, peer tutoring, and instructional communication. In addition, students will reflect upon, discuss, and write about the application of these principles to their tutoring process. No more than 8 credits of Practicum (481, 482, 483) may count toward the 120 hours required for graduation; four may be counted in the English major.

491 – Individual Study (3)

Individual study under the direction of a member of the staff. By permission of the department. Only three credits of individual study may count toward the English major.

492 – Individual Study (1-6)

Individual study for variable credit under the direction of a member of the staff. By permission of the department. Only three credits of individual study may count toward the English major.

499 – Internship (1–6)

Supervised off-campus experience, developed in consultation with the department. Credits variable. Up to three credits may be counted toward the English major.