Business Administration Major

College of Business

College of Business Faculty

Undergraduate Business Administration Degree Program

The College of Business faculty works together closely to support the University’s liberal arts mission. Accordingly, the integrated curriculum provides a balanced rigorous foundation in the core areas of Accounting, Management Information Systems, Finance, Management, and Marketing, all in the context of the broad liberal arts environment provided by the University.

The Faculty hold high expectations of the students and themselves with the goal of developing skills in diagnosing, analyzing, developing and implementing solutions to a wide variety of problems in public and private organizations. The College promotes active learning by encouraging students to manage complex, interdisciplinary problems, marshal resources, and take responsibility for implementing effective solutions. Expected student involvement includes research problems, group case analyses, internships and consulting with organizations throughout the region. Students are encouraged to actively involve themselves in professional service, contributions to society, and the life-long pursuit of knowledge through scholarship and research.

In an environment of mutual trust and support, concerned faculty help students learn the elements of managing resources to achieve a purpose while emphasizing the skills of writing, presenting, and speaking; technological proficiency; and critical thinking in a global context. The students’ relationship with faculty is facilitated by small class size. The faculty work closely with students to instill the values of intellectual integrity and objectivity; tolerance and respect for individuality and diversity; the intrinsic rewards of ethical behavior and social responsiveness; and appropriate competitive vigor balanced with the value of effective collaboration with others.

The Business Administration program provides students the opportunity to go forward in the broadest range of professional directions and build sound and rewarding careers. The academic program leading to a Bachelor of Science degree in Business Administration provides a broad, intellectual outlook and analytical skills for students who wish to combine a liberal arts education with academically rigorous course work in administration and decision-making needed for an eventual career in management or in preparation for graduate study. Course work provides an understanding of the variety of approaches to the complexity of managerial decision-making in the contextual framework of a global society.

An “Executive-in-Residence” program offers students the opportunity for wide-ranging discussions and contact with chief executives from important organizations in the private, public, and not-for-profit sectors.

Scholarships available for majors in business administration include the Frances Holsclaw Brown ’44 Scholarship, the Coleman Family Farm Scholarship, the Evelyn Harrell Scholarship, the Fred. E. Miller Memorial Scholarship, the Benjamin T. Pitts Scholarship, The Elizabeth Griffith Schmidt ’35 Scholarship, the Harry Skinker Scholarship, the George and Monecia Helton Taylor, ’81 Scholarship in Business, and the Wachovia Scholarship in Business. Many students belong to the campus chapters of the Accounting Society and Phi Beta Lambda. Students who establish outstanding records of academic achievement may be elected to Sigma Beta Delta, the national honor society in business management and administration.

Senior Business Administration majors who have a strong interest in research and an outstanding academic record may elect to pursue the Departmental Honors program. To be eligible, a student must have a 3.25 grade-point average in upper-division Business Administration courses and a 3.0 overall grade-point average. Honors work consists of expository or original research written in thesis format and defended before a Honors Committee of faculty. Students pursuing Honors in Business Administration register for three credits of 491 each semester of the senior year.

Requirements for the Business Administration Major

Students considering majoring in Business Administration must take BLAW 201, MATH 200 or its equivalent (CPSC 320, ECON 361, or PSYC 261), and ECON 201 and 202, which are required prerequisites for certain courses in the major.

The Business Administration Major is one of three majors offered within the College of Business leading to the Bachelor’s of Science degree in Business Administration. All business majors are multi-disciplinary degrees, requiring that students master concepts from business disciplines, such as Accounting, Business Administration, Decision Sciences, Finance, Management, Management and Information Systems, Technology, and Marketing.  All majors share a common core of 30 hours of business classes.  This common core consists of:

Lower-Division Requirements: ACCT 101, 102 (ACCT 110 may be taken in place of the ACCT 101/102 sequence); MIST 201; and DSCI 259.

Upper-Division Requirements:  MGMT 301; MKTG 301; BUAD 350; DSCI 353; FINC 301, and MGMT 490.

Student must then complete an additional eighteen (18) credits of classes to earn a Bachelor of Science degree in Business Administration.  Students may major in Business Administration, Accounting, or Marketing.  Upon completion of the program, student transcripts shall state their degree (Bachelor of Science in Business Administration) and their major.

Business Administration Major — upper level electives (18 hours):

18 hours of upper-level electives within the College of Business. Note: A maximum of three (3) credits of 499 courses may count toward the upper level elective requirement.

Experiential Learning

The Business Research Experience course provides students with another option (besides the internship option) for fulfilling the general education experiential learning requirement. The Business Research Experience course is designed to be taken simultaneously with DSCI 259: Applied Statistics and Business Research. The Business Research Experience requires students to undertake a rigorous business research project on behalf of a corporate or non-profit sponsoring organization. Students must submit a proposal by the fourth week of their DSCI 259 class that 1) specifies a corporate or non-profit research sponsor, and 2) outlines a clear problem statement and research plan. If the proposed project is granted approval the student must sign an experiential learning contract that obligates them to complete the stated research. Students who complete the project and achieve the objectives stated in the approved proposal will be deemed to have fulfilled the general education experiential learning requirement. Please contact the Associate Dean for Faculty for further details.

Accounting Course Offerings

Accounting course offerings will be found under the 4 letter code of ACCT in the course listings.  

101 – Principles of Accounting I (3)

This is the first of two-courses that introduces fundamental accounting techniques and procedures for gathering and reporting financial information used by management and others to plan, evaluate, and control and to insure appropriate use and accountability for its resources. Previously taught as BUAD 131.

102 – Principles of Accounting II (3)

Prerequisite: ACCT 101 or equivalent. This is the second of two-courses that introduces fundamental accounting techniques and procedures for gathering and reporting financial information used by management and others to plan, evaluate, and control and to insure appropriate use and accountability for its resources. Previously taught as BUAD 132.

110 – Intensive Principles of Accounting (6)

Introduction of fundamental accounting techniques and procedures for gathering and reporting financial information used by management and others to plan, evaluate, and control, and to insure appropriate use of and accountability for its resources. The course is equivalent to the ACCT 101 and 102 sequence. The course is a substitute for ACCT 101 and 102. Students who have taken ACCT 101 and 102 are not eligible to take this course. Previously taught as BUAD 135.

301 – Intermediate Accounting I (3)

Prerequisite: ACCT 102 or 110 or equivalent; and business administration major or permission of the Associate Dean for Faculty. This is the first of a two-course sequence which places emphasis on the theory and history of accounting principles and their application to the acquisition of assets, determination of income, and the preparation of analysis of financial statements. Previously taught as BUAD 331.

302 – Intermediate Accounting II (3)

Prerequisite: ACCT 301 or equivalent. This is the second of a two-course sequence which places emphasis on the theory and history of accounting principles and their application to the acquisition of assets, determination of income, and the preparation of analysis of financial statements. Course previously taught as BUAD 332.

304 – Cost/Managerial Accounting (3)

Prerequisite: ACCT 102 or 110 or equivalent. The material in this course concentrates on the principles and procedures for planning and controlling routine and non-routine decisions, setting policy, and performing long-range planning. The course focuses on cost behavior, standard costing, flexible budgeting, cost allocation, performance measurement, and analysis for decision-making. Previously taught as BUAD 333.

310 – Federal Taxation of Individuals (3)

Prerequisite: ACCT 102 or ACCT 110 or equivalent; and business administration major or permission of the Associate Dean for Faculty. Federal income taxation of individuals is studied in reference to gross income, deductions and credits, sales, other disposition of property, changes in the law, and economic impact of the law. Previously taught as BUAD 334.

320 – Federal Taxation of Business (3)

Prerequisite: ACCT 310 or equivalent; and business administration major, permission of the Associate Dean for Faculty.  This course develops knowledge about federal income tax for partnerships, corporations, and owners’ fiduciary responsibilities in reporting income.  Course previously taught as BUAD 335.

401 –Accounting Information Systems (3)

Prerequisite: ACCT 102 or 110 or equivalent, MIST 201 or equivalent; and business administration major or permission of the Associate Dean for Faculty. This course covers how information technology is used to effectively manage and control the financial transactions associated with electronic commerce in a global, internet-based economy. Systems selection/development and implementation is analyzed as are the business processes that are integral to the value chain. Specific transaction cycles are discussed with an internal controls focus. Previously taught as BUAD 437.

420 – Governmental and Not-for-Profit Accounting (3)

Prerequisite: ACCT 301 or equivalent; and business administration major or permission of the Associate Dean for Faculty. This course covers governmental accounting, including the reporting requirements and interactions between government-wide financial statements and financial statements for governmental, propriety and fiduciary funds. Budgeting, costing of services, long-term liabilities, debt services, auditing, and evaluation of governmental and not-for-profit entities, including federal and state governments, municipalities, and entities such as schools and hospitals, are examined. Previously taught as BUAD 431.

430 – Advanced Accounting Problems (3)

Prerequisite: ACCT 302 or equivalent; and business administration major or permission of the Associate Dean for Faculty. This course addresses problems in financial accounting and practice theory dealing with partnerships, corporations, consolidated statements, and fiduciary accounting. Previously taught as BUAD 432.

460 – Auditing (3)

Prerequisite: ACCT 301 or equivalent; and business administration major or permission of the Associate Dean for Faculty. This course examines audit concepts, theory, standards, and procedures, as well as ethical and legal requirements within the context of audit evidence, documentation, and testing required before internal and external auditors issue their reports. Previously taught as BUAD 435.

471 – Seminars in Accounting (1-3)

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor, permission of the Associate Dean for Faculty.  Special topics of interest to faculty and students are discussed in individual seminars which focus on accounting.

491 – Individual Study in Accounting (1-3)

Prerequisite: Junior or Senior status; permission of instructor, permission of the Associate Dean for Faculty.  Directed by an accounting faculty member, students conduct individual research focusing on an approved topic of interest in accounting.

 

Business Administration Course Offerings

Business Administration course offerings will be found under the 4 letter code of BUAD in the course listings.

105 – Perspectives on Organizations in Society (3)

The evolution of economic systems from political, sociological, and cultural perspectives are examined in order to understand the interactive nature of business, governmental, and societal systems. This course introduces the conceptual foundations necessary to make informed, well-reasoned analyses of the current issues involving an array of organizations from the private, public, and not-for-profit sectors of the economy.

350 – Business Communication (3)

Prerequisites: DSCI 152, 259; and business administration major or permission of the Associate Dean for Faculty. In this course students study Business Communication as a strategic process. The emphasis of the course is on the practical application of written and oral principles of business communication, including audience management, information control, and mastery of language. Additional areas of study include discourse analysis, oral and multimedia presentation techniques and critiques, intra- and inter-cultural differences in communication, impromptu speaking, and structured and planned briefings.

411 – Financial Modeling (3)

Prerequisite FINC 301.  This course introduces students to technology supporting financial modeling and decision making.  Students will learn to apply and extend the concepts they have learned in the introductory finance course into a spreadsheet model framework of Microsoft Excel.  The course will examine modeling in four primary areas: (1) corporate finance models, (2) fixed income securities models, (3) portfolio models, and (4) option price model.

412 – Advanced Corporate Finance (3)

Prerequisite: FINC 301.  This course develops the processes of making optimal strategic decision by applying corporate financial theory to cases of financial policy, financial instruments and valuation.  The course will focus on six broad topics including cost of capital and capital budgeting, discount cash flow valuation and financial multiples, payout policy, equity and debt financing, corporate control and recapitalizations, and corporate governance.

426 – Communication and Technology (3)

Prerequisite: Business administration major or permission of the Associate Dean for Faculty. This course emphasizes the growing role of digital communication within the business sector. Students will analyze, design, implement and test a website or interactive media project. In so doing, students will be introduced to broader communication concepts such as written and visual rhetoric, digital design, information architecture, and organizational image.

464 – Business Ethics (3)

Prerequisite: Senior status; and business administration major or permission of the Associate Dean for Faculty. A study of ethical conduct in management and the elements involved. The course will use a series of applied case studies (illustrating both positive and negative models) to provide an understanding of how to recognize a moral dilemma, evaluate the implications of proposed actions and develop a response. The student should leave with an understanding of ethics and social responsibility as they relate to management.

471 – Business Administration Seminars (1-3)

Prerequisite: Business Administration major, permission of instructor, and permission of the Associate Dean for Faculty. Special topics of interest to staff and students are discussed in individual seminars which focus on specific areas within the various disciplines of Business Administration.

473 – Environment of International Business Seminar (3)

Prerequisites: ECON 201; and business administration major or permission of the Associate Dean for Faculty. The political, cultural, and economic aspects of the international business environment are explored in depth. The goal of this seminar is to develop an understanding of the forces at work in the global conduct of business across national boundaries.

491 – Individual Study in Business Administration (variable credit, 1–3)

Prerequisites: Junior or senior status, requires permission of instructor and permission of the Associate Dean for Faculty. Directed by a department faculty member, students conduct individual research focusing on an approved topic of interest in business administration. This course does not satisfy the upper-level elective requirement for the major.

499 – Internship (variable credit, 1–3)

Prerequisites: Junior or senior status; business administration major, minor or 15 hours of BUAD courses or equivalent; permission of instructor and permission of the Associate Dean of Faculty.  A supervised work experience in a sponsoring organization developed in consultation with, and under the supervision of, a department faculty member. This course does not satisfy the upper-level elective requirement for the major. Directed by a department faculty member, students conduct individual research focusing on an approved topic of interest in business administration. A maximum of three (3) credits of 499 courses may count toward the upper level elective requirement.

Business Law Course Offerings

Business Law course offerings will be found under the 4 letter code of BLAW in the course listings.  

201 – Legal Environment of Business (3)

This course focuses on the legal, political, and ethical framework in which businesses and other types of organizations operate.  Topics include: Common law and statutory business crimes and torts, common law contracts, business entities, securities regulation, employer/employee relations, environmental protection, and personal and real property laws, In addition, the legal consequences of the choice of business entity are explored while studying sole proprietorships, partnerships, and corporations. Course previously taught as BUAD 283.

301 – Commercial Law (3)

Prerequisite: BLAW 201 or equivalent; and business administration major or permission of Associate Dean for Faculty.  This course provides in-depth study of laws affecting commercial transactions and the rationale underlying rights and obligations of parties to these transactions.  The Uniform Code is emphasized, especially the Articles dealing with Sales, Commercial Paper, Bank Deposits, Bulk Transfers, Document of Title, and Secured Transactions.  The topics of Antitrust, Consumer Protection, Labor Law, and Insurance matters are explored.  Course previously taught as BUAD 384A.

Decision Sciences Course Offerings

Decision Sciences course offerings will be found under the 4 letter code of DSCI in the course listings.  

219 – Foundations for Data Science (3)

Skills and tools in acquiring, parsing, manipulating, and preparing data for statistical analysis. Course previously taught as BUAD 219.

259 – Applied Statistics and Business Research (3)

Prerequisite: MATH 200 or similar Statistics course. This course introduces students to the scientific method to facilitate their understanding of what constitutes good and bad research and enable them to design and conduct research studies.  In addition, the course provides students with skills necessary to analyze, synthesize and evaluate statistical information in order to make informed and appropriate decisions in the workplace and to prepare students for research courses in graduate school.  Course previously taught as BUAD 259.

353 – Decision Analysis (3)

Prerequisite: MIST 201 or equivalent and MATH 200 or similar statistics course.  This course introduces a variety of Management Science models for use in analysis of “business” problems.  A computer software package provides the computational basics for case analysis of problems in linear programming, inventory, waiting lines, PERT/CPM, and simulation.  Course previously taught as BUAD 353.

363 – Operations Management (3)

Prerequisite: DSCI 353 or equivalent; and business administration major or permission of the Associate Dean for Faculty.  Operations management is an area of business concerned with the production of goods and services.  It involves the study of concepts, theories and techniques relating to the operations functions in both manufacturing and service organizations.  Lectures, discussions, and case studies are used to provide a comprehensive knowledge of the theories, current practices, and trends in several topical areas of operations management.  Quantitative tools of analysis used to support decision making in the various operations management are surveyed.  Course previously taught as BUAD 363.

401 – Foundation and Applications of Data Analytics (3)

Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in CPSC 220 or equivalent.  This course develops an overview of the challenges of developing and applying analytics for insight and decision=making.  Examples and cases will come from customer relation management, pricemodeling, social media analytics, location analysis and other business domains.  Course previously taught as BUAD 403.

402 – Analytics Applications and Development (4)

Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in CPSC 220 or equivalent.  A course in programming and data manipulation techniques for constructing analytics-based applications.  Topics include SQL or no-SQL databases, using web service API’s to acquire data, introduction to Hadoop and MapReduce, and use of third-party analytic component API’s.  Course previously taught as BUAD 400.

Finance Course Offerings

Finance course offerings will be found under the 4 letter code of FINC in the course listings.  

301 – Principles of Finance (3)

Prerequisite: ECON 201, ACCT 102 or ACCT 110 or equivalent, MIST 201 or equivalent, DSCI 259 or equivalent, DSCI 353 or equivalent; and business administration major or permission of the Associate Dean for Faculty.  An overview of financial management which provides identification and solution of financial problems. Coverage includes the role of financial management, tools of financial analysis, cost of capital, financial structure, long term assets and financial forecasting. Course previously taught as BUAD 381A.

Management Course Offerings

Management course offerings will be found under the 4 letter code of MGMT in the course listings.  

301 – Principles of Management (3)

Prerequisite: Junior status or permission of the Associate Dean for Faculty.  An intergrative approach to organizational concepts, principles, philosophy, and theory in public, private, and not-for-profit organizations is emphasized.  Current decision-making approaches utilizing theories of organizational behavior, general systems and contingency theories are linked to the managerial functions of planning, organizing, leadership, and control.

345 –Organizational Behavior (3)

Prerequisite: MGMT 301 or equivalent.  This course explores the behavioral aspects of organizations, presenting concepts, theories, research and research techniques that can be applied to enhance understanding of people in organizations.  Topics included are personnel selection and placement, job and work environments, worker motivation, job satisfaction, and the organizational and social context of human work.  Course previously taught as BUAD 345. Cross-listed as PSYC 385.

346 – Human Resource Management (3)

Prerequisite: MGMT 301 or equivalent; and business administration major or permission of the Associate Dean for Faculty.  The philosophy, principles, and policies needed to develop effective personnel management and industrial relations programs in business, government, and not-for-profit organizations are developed and discussed.  Course previously taught as BUAD 346.  Cross-listed as PSYC 386.

347 – Organizational Development & Change (3)

Prerequisite: Business administration major and MGMT 301 or equivalent; or permission of the Associate Dean for Faculty.  This course develops a system-wide application of behavioral science methods, theories, and accumulated knowledge to the change and reinforcement of organizational strategies, structures, and processes for improving organizational effectiveness. Course previously taught as BUAD 347.  Cross-listed as PSYC 387.

420 – Negotiation (3)

Prerequisite: BUAD 350, senior status; and business administration major or permission of the Associate Dean for Faculty. An exploration of negotiation techniques and strategies, including: understanding opponents, determining needs and identifying objectives, and managing concessions and power dynamics, all with an eye towards maintaining goodwill and building long-term, productive professional relationships.  The course will cover individual, group, multi-party, agented, and cross-cultured negotiations, through theoretical study and practical application.  Course previously taught as BUAD 420.  Cross-listed as MKTG 420.

425 –  Leadership Theory and Practice (3)

Prerequisite: MIST 201 or equivalent. This course involves study of contemporary leadership theory, with emphasis on practical application of those theories.  Characteristics of effective leaders, contemporary leadership models, strategic leadership, ethics, power, politics, influence tactics, teamwork, motivation and coaching skills, creativity and innovation, communication, and conflict resolution, are discussed,  Students have the opportunity to explore personal leadership styles, learn how to modify them, how to apply them effectively in their work, and write a personal vision statement. Experiential exercises, cases, and other strategies are applied to enhance learning theory and acquire, enhance, and integrate leadership skills related to leading contemporary work organizations.  Course previously taught as BUAD 425.

460 – Management Creativity (3)

Prerequisite: Senior status; business administration major or permission of the Associate Dean for Faculty.  This course’s objective is to develop understanding of the role of creativity in decision-making and problem solving, and to recognize the role of intuition in such processes, management is decision making and most non-routine decisions ultimately rely on uncertain or vague information and less-than precise data.  This course will help to temper the theoretical education with future managers.  This course was previously taught as BUAD 460.

490 – Strategic Management (3)

Prerequisite: BLAW 201, BUAD 350 FINC 301, MGMT 301, MKTG 301; and Business Administration major or permission of the Associate Dean for Faculty.  A capstone course designed to integrate the student’s study of management.  Advanced case studies and simulations prove a series of integrating experiences where students assume the role of the chief executive officer in a variety of organizational sectors (private, public, not-for-profit).  Students are required to make managerial decisions concerning formulation of policy, strategy and tactics along with ethical considerations in organizations’ mulit-faceted relationships with the external environment.

Management Information Systems Course Offerings

Management Information Systems course offerings will be found under the 4 letter code of MIST in the course listings.  

201 – Management Information Systems and Applications (3)

The purpose of this course is to examine the technical, business and management aspects of management information systems through the study of MIS theory and concepts.  Emphasis is placed on how and why different types of information systems have become an essential part of organizations.  Students gain experience solving real world business problems using different information systems applications throughout the course.  Course previously taught as BUAD 152.

301 – Principles of Knowledge Management Systems (3)

Prerequisite: MIST 201 or equivalent; and business administration major or permission of the Associate Dean for Faculty.  The design and implementation of knowledge management systems that support a variety of business areas are emphasized.  Management challenges associated with collecting, organizing and sharing knowledge are discussed in detail.  Course previously taught as BUAD 356.

350 – Database Management Systems (3)

Prerequisite: MIST 201 or equivalent; and business administration major or permission of the Associate Dean for Faculty. The importance of relational databases in business environments is emphasized and demonstrated through real-world case studies and exercise.  Students gain experience in planning, designing, developing and implementing business application databases for different business purposes such as modeling and decision making. Course previously taught as BUAD 354.

411 – Information Security (3)

Prerequisite: MIST 201 or equivalent; and business administration major or permission of Associate Dean for Faculty.  This course provides an understanding of the concepts involved in securing information, both from a technical and business perspective. Skills required to analyzed and evaluate the security of information from a variety of view points are presented. Current research is used to discuss management issues associated with creating policies and implementing procedures for information security in organizations. Course previously taught as BUAD 441.

450 – Systems Analysis  and Design (3)

Prerequisite: MIST 201 or equivalent; and business administration major or permission of the Associate Dean for Faculty.  This course examines systems analysis theory and concepts that are used to design and analyze different types of information systems from a technical and business perspective.  Systems analysis techniques and design processes used by organizations are presented.  The complexity of analyzing and designing information systems to support current and future business. Course previously taught as BUAD 446.

448 –  Project Management for IT (3)

Prerequisite: MIST 201 or equivalent; and business administration major or permission of the Associate Dean for Faculty.  This course covers methods for the analysis, design, and implementation of information technology projects from a project management and information systems perspective.  Topics include investigating hardware and software needs, cost estimating, scheduling, and human resource management.  Students are required to design feasibility plans based on current research.  Principles, methods, tools, and techniques available to assist managers in planning, implementing, and controlling projects are also discussed.  Practical projects and the implications for managers are addressed.  Course was previously taught BUAD 338. (credit not granted for both MIST 445 and CIST 461)

Marketing Course Offerings

Marketing course offerings will be found under the 4 letter code of MKTG in the course listings.  

301 – Principles of Marketing (3)

Prerequisite: ECON 201 or 202; and junior status.  The place of marketing in the global economy and the policies and practices of marketing institutions are explored.  Major topics included are marketing functions, organization, research, merchandising, channels of distribution and transportation.  Also, problems concerning ethics and social responsibility in the marketing arena are discussed.  Course previously taught as BUAD 310.

411 – Marketing Research (3)

Prerequisite: DSCI 259 or equivalent; MKTG 301 or equivalent; and business administration major or permission of the Associate Dean for Faculty.  Research in marketing is used as a tool to identify, collect and analyze data relevant to decision-making for businesses.  Relevant statistical software is used to analyze client data.  Ethical considerations related to research findings are also discussed.  Course previously taught as BUAD 413.

420 – Negotiation (3)

Prerequisite: BUAD 350, senior status; and business administration major or permission of the Associate Dean for Facutly. An exploration of negotiation techniques and strategies, including: understanding opponents, determining needs and identifying objectives, and managing concessions and power dynamics, all with an eye towards maintaining goodwill and building long-term, productive professional relationships.  The course will cover individual, group, multi-party, agented, and cross-cultured negotiations, through theoretical study and practical application.  Course previously taught as BUAD 420.  Cross-listed as MKTG 420.

450 – Consumer Behavior (3)

Prerequisite: MKTG 301 or equivalent; and business administration major or permission of Associate Dean for Faculty.   This course examines the contributions of behavioral sciences toward understanding and predicting consumer behavior, especially as it pertains to the decison-making process.  It is vital for marketers and managers to understand why different people make different decisions in the same circumstances in order to better serve them.  This course looks at the empirical evidence from a variety of sources on why various segments behave as they do.  This is a speaking intensive (SI) course.

460 – International Marketing (3)

Prerequisite: MKTG 301 or equivalent; and business administration major or permission of Associate Dean for Faculty.    The focus of this course is to understand the challenges companies face in conducting the international marketing.  Students explore various strategies to successfully manage international marketing efforts, including analysis of world markets, consumer behavior, foreign environments, and the marketing management methods required to meet the demands of the global marketplace.  The problems of foreign competition, diminishing U.S. market share, and U.S. economy’s interdependence with world markets are covered.  Also assessed are different foreign market entry strategies.  Course previously taught as BUAD 410.

471 – Seminars in Marketing (1-3)

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor or permission of the Associate Dean for Faculty.  Special topics of interest to faculty and students are discussed in individual seminars which focus on marketing.

490 – Marketing Strategy (3)
Prerequisite: MKTG 301; AND business major OR marketing minor OR permission of the Associate Dean for Faculty. This course serves as a capstone survey of the major topics in contemporary marketing. Topics included are delineation of market targets, the development and implementation of the marketing mix, the control and analysis of the total marketing effort, strategy, strategic decision-making tools, ethics, as well as comprehensive case studies or the use of a comprehensive simulation. Course previously taught as BUAD 414.

491 – Individual Study in Marketing (1-3)

Prerequisite: Junior or Senior status, permission of instructor, permission of Associate Dean for Faculty.  Directed by a marketing faculty member, students conduct individual research focusing on an approved topic of interest in marketing.

499 – Marketing Internship (1-3)

Prerequisite: Marketing or Business Administration major; 9 hours of MKTG courses or equivalent; permission of instructor; permission of Associate Dean for Faculty.  A supervised work experience in a sponsoring organization developed with, and under the supervision of a marketing faculty member.  A maximum of 3 hours of 499 classes in the College of Business may be used toward the upper-level elective requirement for any of the majors in the College of Business.